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Atomic, Molecular and Optical

 

Dunning 01

Hazzard

Hulet 01

F. B. Dunning

Professor

 

Kaden Hazzard

 Assistant Professor

 

Randall Hulet

Professor

 

Killian 01

Pu 01

Thomas Killian

 Professor

 

Han Pu

Associate Professor

 

 

Primary Current Research Efforts of Rice AMO Faculty

See also the Condensed Matter page for related research


Barry Dunning

Engineering atomic wavefunctions with short-duration pulsed electric fields

Non-linear dynamics and classical and quantum chaos

Behavior of atoms in the presence of a nearby surface

Ultra-low-energy electron-molecule scattering


Kaden Hazzard

Theoretical atomic, molecular, and optical physics

Ultracold atoms and molecules, Rydberg atoms, and trapped ions: strongly correlated phases and dynamics

Quantum simulation

Quantum metrology and other quantum technologies


Randall Hulet

Behavior of quantum degenerate systems including Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluid states of paired atomic Fermi gases

Use of cold-atom model systems to explore non-Fermi liquid behavior in strongly correlated fermions

Quantum magnetism

Ultra-cold collisions


Tom Killian

Ultra-cold collisions

Strongly-coupled ultra-cold neutral plasmas


Han Pu

Behavior of quantum degenerate systems including Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluid states of paired atomic Fermi gases

Use of cold-atom model systems to explore non-Fermi liquid behavior in strongly correlated fermions

Quantum magnetism

Quantum information

Atom Optics


Links above have complete descriptions of ongoing research programs

Examples of AMO research at Rice:

 
A false-color rendering of a two-dimensional image of a phase separated cloud of lithium-6 atoms. The tall, semi-transparent central region consists of fully paired atoms, one spin-up atom for every spin-down. This core region is believed to be a superfluid. The opaque peaks on either side, as well as the faint ring around the bottom, are the excess unpaired spin-up atoms that have been expelled from the central core. The light in the background is a representation of the probe laser beam used to capture this image.            
 
The blue fluorescence is light scattered from one billion   strontium atoms that are trapped with lasers and cooled to 1 millikelvin. Laser-cooled strontium is used to produce ultracold neutral plasmas and to study fundamental atom-photon and atom-atom interactions.